DUMC Box 3842

Duke Clinics, 40 Duke Medicine Circle

3rd Floor, Purple Zone, Suite 3700
Durham, NC 27710
Tel: 919-681-7231

© 2014 by ACT at Duke 

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Phone: 919-681-7231

ACT at Duke Well-Represented at ACBS in Seattle

June 21, 2016

 

The ACT at Duke Team has a wonderful experience sharing their knowledge while learning from their peers at the 14th annual ACBS World Conference in Seattle, WA! 

 

Rhonda Merwin, PhD and Ashley Moskovich, PhD shared the stage to highlight their work in the field of disordered eating for a symposium highlighting a number of their studies and ongoing research. See further description below.

 

Dr. Merwin, Moskovich, and Lisa Honeycutt, LPCS all joined together for a workshop, led by Dr. Merwin, titled, "You Can't Eat That: Engaging Inviduals with Anorexia Nervosa in Self-Compassion and Self-Care. See further description below. 

 

Lisa Honeycutt, LPCS also took part in an IGNITE talk titled, "How Families are Like Minds: The Mind, The Family System and the ACT Model." IGNITE talks are fairly new to ACBS, and totally new to Lisa! This was her first "official" ACBS conference and her first IGNITE. 

ACBS described the IGNITE presentation like this, The IGNITE presentation is a short, structured talk in which presenters present on ideas and issues they are most passionate about using a “deck” of 20 slides that auto-advance every 15 seconds (no exceptions). Topics may be empirical, conceptual, philosophical, historical, or methodological. Presentation should be well-practiced and high energy (perhaps even... fun!). Help cheer for these unusual talks by our very brave presenters.

 

The ACT at Duke Team ended the week with tours of Seattle, feeling both exhausted and enthusiastic about what they presented, what they learned, and what the future will hold for their team and the entire ACBS community that they are all so proud to be a part of!

 Next Stop, SPAIN! 

 

 

Program Descriptions

71. You Can’t Eat That: Engaging Individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (or Other Issues of Rigid Rule-Based Self-Regulation) in SelfCompassion and Self-Care Workshop 

Components: Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Anorexia Nervosa Target Audience: Interm., Adv. Location: Pine Rhonda M. Merwin*, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Lisa K. Honeycutt, M.A., Duke University Medical Center

 

Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) are vicious in the abuse that they self-inflict: exercising past exhaustion and when physically dangerous; denying food as a form of punishment; and ultimately for a tragic minority, death by suicide (1-2). Although AN may be formulated as pathological weight regulation driven by a distorted view of the body; broadening the vantage point, AN may be conceptualized as a verbally-mediated, punitive form of self-regulation. In this workshop, we will teach strategies to address this system of self-regulation which perpetuates not only physical, but also emotional deprivation. Participants will learn how to formulate cases along this dimensional space and engage clients in a process of letting go of this strategy in favor of greater self-kindness and compassion. Content is based on 10 years of experience treating individuals with AN and anorexia-spectrum issues in a medical center affiliated outpatient clinic for eating disorders. Participants will be invited to engage in “real play” and are encouraged to bring a willingness to enter into the difficult emotional spaces that our clients (and we) face. Workshop material is also relevant to other populations that exhibit rigid adherence to rules and obsessionality (e.g., obsessive-compulsive spectrum). Educational Objectives: 1. Describe AN spectrum issues as verbally mediated punitive, self-regulation. 2. Understand how rigid rule following functions for the individual, and discriminate avoidance and fusion (which may have an unexpected form in this population). 3. Appreciate how the processes of psychological flexibility can be engaged to help clients use signals arising from the body to inform self-care decisions.

 

104. Eating Disorder Interventions Symposium  

Components: Original data Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Beh. med., Anorexia Nervosa, Eating Disorders Target Audience: Beg., Interm., Adv. Location: Vashon 1 Chair: Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Discussant: Adria Pearson-Mauro, Ph.D., University of Colorado, Denver Eating disorders and efforts to control weight are major issues for our population. These studies will discuss findings on two groups who struggle with these issues – people with Anorexia Nervosa and people with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is one of the deadliest psychiatric conditions and is extremely challenging to treat. According to a contextual approach, rigid rulefollowing might be a significant factor in the behavior of those with AN. We present data from a study on the relationship between insensitivity to contingencies and tolerance of uncertainty in adults weight-recovered from AN. In another study, we examined the effect of an ACT-based family treatment for adolescents with AN with particular attention to psychological flexibility and anxiety reduction as processes of change in adolescent and parent behavior. We also present data from studies on the impact of negative affect, distress, and avoidance related to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and eating disorders and proper insulin administration. We describe how we are translating these findings into an ACT-based mobile intervention to improve management in the natural environment as well as how these findings might inform practice within endocrinology clinics to reduce the incidence of EDs in this vulnerable population.  Diabetes Distress and Avoidance: Key Contributors to Life-Threatening Eating Disorders in Type 1 Diabetes Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Natalia O. Dmitrieva, Ph.D., Northern Arizona University Nancy L. Zucker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Lisa K. Honeycutt, M.A., Duke University Medical Center Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center  Rigid Rule-following and Intolerance of Uncertainty in Anorexia Nervosa S A T U R D A Y 70 Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Nancy L. Zucker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center  Psychological Flexibility as a Process of Change in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Lisa K. Honeycutt, M.A., Duke University Medical Center Nancy L. Zucker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center James D. Herbert, Ph.D., Drexel University C. Alix Timko, Ph.D., Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Natalia O. Dmitrieva, Ph.D., Northern Arizona University  Using Mobile Technology to Reach Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Intentionally Withholding Insulin to Lose Weight Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Natalia O. Dmitrieva, Ph.D., Northern Arizona University Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Lisa K. Honeycutt, M.A., Duke University Medical Center Nancy L. Zucker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Richard S. Surwit, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center Mark Feinglos, M.D., Duke University Medical Center Educational Objectives: 1. Describe neurocognitive differences observed among individuals with anorexia nervosa (e.g., deficits in set-shifting) behaviorally. 2. Discuss how psychological flexibility as a process of change may inform the continued evolution of family-based treatment in adolescent anorexia nervosa. 3. Describe how findings are being translated into an ACT-based mobile intervention to reduce insulin restriction for weight control in the natural environment.

 

 

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